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The Buick Century Caballero Estate Wagon was positioned by Buick near the upper end of the market. It featured the unique Buick styling cues, powered by the Century's powerful V8 engines, and given a long list of amenities and luxury items. It was only produced for two years between 1957 and 1958.

History

They were quick and refined machines. However, the Caballero was produced for only a short time, lasting from 1957 through 1958. The car had high construction costs which resulted in Buick canceling the Caballero along with the Century name the following year. The Century nameplate would be later revived and adorned on Buick vehicles while the Caballero name has laid dormant.

This 1957 Buick Century Caballero Wagon was offered for sale at the 2007 RM Auctions held in Meadow Brook. The car was estimated to fetch between $80,000 - $100,000.

Engine

It is powered by a 364 cubic-inch V8 engine that is capable of producing an estimated 300 horsepower. The car has a three-speed gearbox and four-wheel drum brakes. The car also came with a Dynaflow automatic transmission with a new Variable Pitch feature. The top speed of the Caballero wa 110mph (177kmh) and they could go from 0-60mph in 10.0 seconds.

Station Wagon

With styling inspired by the Centurion 'dream car' from 1956, Buick fielded an all-new line of cars for 1957. This distinctive new automobile was instantly identifiable, with its graceful interpretation of Buick's traditional 'Sweep Spear side trim, full wheel openings and dipper rear beltline. Vertical grille bars, 'Venti-Port' trims on front fenders and vertical rear tail lamps were all in keeping with recent Buick design trends.

The daring Century Caballero Estate Wagon - GM's finest and most expensive station wagon - wore Buick's new styling especially well. Especially noteworthy is the full four-door hardtop 'pillar-less' construction. Buick station wagon bodies were constructed by the Ionia Body Company, an independent supplier to GM located near Flint. The all-steel estate car with its pillarless design combined two of the most innovative body styles of the post war era.